Tuesday, April 19, 2011

AP IMPACT: Asia Nuclear Reactors Face Tsunami Risk - GeoEye is Elevating Insight

JAKARTA, Indonesia—The skeleton of what will soon be one of the world's biggest nuclear plants is slowly taking shape along China's southeastern coast—right on the doorstep of Hong Kong's bustling metropolis. Three other facilities nearby are up and running or under construction.

Like Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi plant they lie within a few hundred miles of the type of fault known to unleash the largest tsunami-spawning earthquakes.

FILE - This March 12, 2011 file photo provided by GeoEye shows the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, a day after an earthquake and tsunami hit Japan's east coast. Tokyo Electric Power Co., which runs the hobbled Fukushima plant, did not factor geologic evidence of the giant Jogan tsunami of 869 A.D. into its preparedness. When a tsunami hit in March 2011, it unleashed waves up to 42 feet (14 meters) high, swamping the backup generators needed for cooling. The same region was also walloped twice before, once around 140 B.C. and again sometime between 600 B.C. and 900 B.C., scientific studies revealed. ((AP Photo/GeoEye, File))

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